Cut to future shock

 

Cut to future shock (Oil on Canvas 24” X 30”)Cut to future shock (Oil on Canvas 24” X 30”)

(The performance)

A relationship exists between painting and music; they both fall under the arts umbrella but are distinct in their form. Each piece of music that has and will ever be written is generated by feeling and provokes a response in the listener. The emotional tide of the song, created by the musician, manifests itself in the listener. But it is not emotion alone that makes music so popular. Many different factors make music what it is today: aspects of genre, artistic character, technique, talent, and the culture giving rise to it.

Painting too comes from within; it is created by the artist to provoke a response from the viewer. The painter establishes a relationship with the viewer not dissimilar to the musician and his listener. In the painter’s armoury is colour and text providing a visual effect whereas the musician has sound through the use of voice and the use of instruments to provoke the desired feeling from the viewer/listener. Both are intended to provoke a response and both are considered art forms.

By painting aspects visually representing music, the lines of distinction become blurred – music and painting begin to merge. The viewer is able to experience an emotion associated with music visually and to understand that without these visual manifestations of feeling, music can otherwise never exist in visual form. Through this process, it is important to convey emotions associated with music through painting. From the collective experience, the beauty and raw emotion of performance, a visual image can provide an interpretation of the message the musician is conveying.

The aim is to closely examine the performance of the musician through painting and how that musical element can affect the viewer. It also underlines why performance art is so important in popular culture.