On the turning away

On the turning away (Oil on un-stretched Canvas)

On the turning away (Oil on un-stretched Canvas)

A connection can be made between painting and photography, even though they are distinctly different mediums. Photography functions to capture a real moment that has to be experienced through the lens of a camera. Without the camera the moment cannot be portrayed in a physical form. It remains intangible, relying on the spoken word to be shared and made public.

A Painting originates from the mind. It is a product of the artist’s own experience, memory or idea and it does not necessarily require a physical image to begin the creative process. It is dependant on the judgment of the artist to process ideas and paint in a way he/ she chooses; painting is therefore an open minded pursuit in comparison to photography which can only exist in its true form the photograph.

By painting photographic images the two mediums become one. Imbued within the fabric of the photograph is experience and memory, whereas the painting is seductive with its tactile qualities. Merged together into a single image, the viewer is presented with something that will assault all of the senses, “photography has played an increasing role in providing raw material for realist painters whose recognizable subject matter and local overtone appeal to patrons” (Michael Dunn 2003:).

Images of the everyday are powerful, even if they are from photographs taken sixty years ago. Through the use of images from the past to the present day, parallels can be drawn between such ordinary activities such as playing music, playing sport or relaxing on a work break. It is a pertinent reminder of the human condition, in viewing work containing human presence, the viewer desires to look for similarities and relationships to connect with the past and to experience a form of nostalgia.